VantagePoint is AbleLink’s cognitively accessible Consumer Satisfaction survey system that enables individuals with cognitive disabilities to have their voice heard by self-reporting their own uninfluenced opinions regarding agency services.  The foundation of VantagePoint is AbleLink’s award-winning research-based ATLAS (Accessible Testing, Learning & Assessment System) survey engine that utilizes principles of universal design to provide a cognitively accessible test and survey system. VantagePoint provides easy-to-follow instructions, self-directed training, as well as questions and answers in a variety of multimedia formats to enhance accessibility. Survey respondents can navigate through the self-directed surveys by simply responding to questions that are read to them with a natural voice, and selecting from the available responses, which can also can contain pictures and audio playback to promote independence in providing survey responses.  VantagePoint includes a battery of four comprehensive surveys addressing key agency service areas, including:

Survey responses are automatically uploaded to an organization's personalized, secure cloud-based ATLAS Report Repository in real-time to enable immediate access to all survey results without incurring additional costs for staff to enter data into a database or from using a scanned data entry process. The results of individual surveys can be viewed, printed and shared as needed, and the Report Repository also provides “up to the minute” graphs and charts showing your agencies service satisfaction results from all survey respondents. The aggregated results can also be downloaded from the secure website as a CSV (comma separated values) data file that can be imported into Excel or SPSS (or virtually any data analysis software) for detailed data analysis.

The specific questions and answers that make up the VantagePoint surveys have been derived from several years of research and development in the area of consumer satisfaction surveys specifically related to surveying individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as via input from experts with a combined total of over 35 years working with and for developmental disabilities service agencies in all areas of programs and services. The ATLAS approach has been systematically beta tested with over five hundred individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities over the past three years, and several journal articles have been published documenting the accessibility of the system (see references section).

VantagePoint’s ATLAS engine is the result of over ten years of research and development focused specifically on accessible survey design for individuals with cognitive disabilities conducted in collaboration with the University of Kansas's Beach Center on Disability (www.beachcenter.org) and Westchester Institute for Human Development (www.wihd.org). References for several journal articles and other relevant publications describing the research underlying the ATLAS system are listed below.

White, A., O’Hara, D., Charrier, F., Liberatos, P., Stock, S.E. and Davies, D.K. (2015). Promoting Self-Determination in Health for People with Intellectual Disabilities through Accessible Surveys of their Healthcare Experiences, Journal of Human Development, Disability, and Social Change, Jan. 2015.

Davies, D.K., Stock, S.E., Patrick, P. and O’Hara, D. (2015) MyNutritionPlanner: Development and Evaluation of an Innovative Software Approach for Increasing Independence and Understanding in Healthy Nutrition Planning and Execution by People with Down Syndrome, Phase I Final Project Report submitted to the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Child Health and Human Development, Sept. 2015.

Schwartz, A.A., Bacon, A., O’Hara, D., Davies, D.K., Stock, S.E., and Brown, C. (2013). Using Cognitively Accessible Survey Software on a Tablet Computer to Promote Self-Determination among People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Journal of Human Development, Disability, and Social Change, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 17-28.

Tanis, E.S., Palmer, S.B., Wehmeyer, M.L., Davies, D.K., Stock, S.E., Lobb, K. and Bishop, B. (2012). Self-Report Computer-Based Survey of Technology Use by People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 53-68.

Davies, D. K. and Stock, S. E. (2008). ATLAS: An Accessible Testing, Learning and Assessment System for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities to Facilitate Inclusion and Access to the General Curriculum, Phase I Final Project Report submitted to the U.S. Dept. of Education, April 2008.

Davies, D. K. and Stock, S. E. (2006). Job Quest: A Self-Directed Career Exploration and Assessment System For Students and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, Phase II Final Report submitted to the U.S. Dept. of Education, September 2006.

Stock, S. E., Davies, D. K., and Wehmeyer, M. L. (2004). Internet-Based Multimedia Tests and Surveys for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 19(4), 43-47.

Stock, S. E., Davies, D. K., Secor, R. R., and Wehmeyer, M.L. (2003). Self-directed career preference selection for individuals with intellectual disabilities: Using computer technology to enhance self-determination. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 19, 95-103.

Stock, S.E. and Davies, D.K. (2003). Job Quest: A Self-Directed Career Exploration and Assessment System For Students and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, Phase I Final Report submitted to the U.S. Dept. of Education, April 2003.

Stock, S.E., Davies, D.K. and Brown, R.B. (2003). NutraNet: An Internet Based Self-Directed Multimedia Nutritional Planning and Grocery Shopping System for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities, Phase II Final Report submitted to the U.S. Dept. of Education, September 2003.

Stock, S. and Davies, D. (2003). QuestNet: A Customizable Internet-Based Self-Directed Testing and Assessment System for Individuals with Mental Retardation, Phase I Final Report submitted to the U.S. Dept. of Education, April 2003.

Stock, S.E. and Davies, D.K. (2001). NutraNet: An Internet Based Self-Directed Multimedia Nutritional Planning and Grocery Shopping System for Individuals with Mental Retardation, Phase I Final Project Report submitted to the US Department of Education, March, 2001.

Stock, S. E., Davies, D. K., and Secor, R. (1996). WorkSight: A Multimedia Based Job Matching System for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities to Enhance Self-Determination and Success in Career Selection. SBIR Phase I Final Report submitted to the US Dept. of Education, March 29, 1996.

About AbleLink Technologies

AbleLink Technologies was founded in 1997 specifically to address the significant need for research-based cognitive support technologies for individuals with cognitive disabilities and those experiencing cognitive decline. Our team has been built purposefully with individuals representing relevant fields of expertise including human services, human factors, rehab technology, software engineering, occupational therapy, and clinical and experimental psychology. The company is headquartered in a 115-year-old Victorian home just north of downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado, adjacent to the campus of Colorado College. AbleLink researchers have conducted over 65 research and development projects to investigate, research, and develop technology applications for individuals with cognitive disabilities and for seniors utilizing technology to help "age in place." Our research findings demonstrating the benefits of cognitive support technologies have been published in various peer-reviewed research journals, such as the Journal of Special Education Technology, Intellectual and Developmental Disability, and the Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities.